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PRIVACY/COOKIES
About Michelle Manafy

Michelle Manafy is the editor of Intranets and EContent magazine.

Articles by Michelle Manafy
Companies everywhere are trying to conjure the magic formula that will miraculously transform their corporate intranet from being just another place to find the company phone list to its rightful role as the lifeblood of corporate communications. Intranets.com has developed a philosophy to coincide: the company rolls out upgrades and new features on an almost continual basis in order to either anticipate or satisfy customer requests for functionality that will help make their intranet a must-hit site.
Editorial/News & Tools
HarperCollins’ intranet consists of 70 dynamic and 10 static Web sites, which can be accessed by employees from their seven U.S. locations and Toronto, Canada. The dynamic sites are used for vacation scheduling, sending jobs to the copy center, providing sales information, accessing corporate services, and email. Static sites include the HarperCollins home page, “HarperSource,” where employees access publishing industry-specific information including external content provided by the Corporate Librarian Group, and “HR Online,” which offers information on a wide variety of human resources-related initiatives. Most of the sites draw from an SQL server data warehouse based on ASP, although the company has begun a migration to Cold Fusion.
Editorial/Features Jan/Feb 2004 Issue,
Given the trend of companies downsizing (what a charming euphemism for laying-off employees), corporate survivors have a lot more than survivor guilt to deal with. Despite limited resources, department heads face an ever-increasing demand for intellectual capital. Enter the intranet, which was supposed to be an inward-facing microcosm of what the Internet has accomplished for communication worldwide: an exponential increase in information availability and the facilitation of communication. Yet, like so many attempts at translating the organic information explosion of the Internet into managed business processes, it’s taking more than a few tries to get it right.
Editorial/Columns Jan/Feb 2004 Issue,